Dog Sledding in Sweden

Posted by on in Travel

Set yourself apart from the pack and sign up for a dog sledding trip to Sweden. Your inner adventurer will be fulfilled by mushing through an action-packed getaway in Sweden’s rugged Lapland region. Learn to “mush” with your own team of huskies through forests of pine.

Where in Sweden can you dog sled?

Lapland, The Arctic Circle

Take a day tour with professional guides who will provide you with food and a team of dogs. Enjoy the vast landscapes and beautiful wildlife at the foot of the mountain Gardfjallet. You can also take a three day action packed tour through the wilderness. During this tour, get a chance to see the Northern Lights and stay at the world-famous ICEHOTEL. If you are looking for something more extreme, take a dog sledding tour of six or 12 days.

Swedish Mountains, Svenkska Fjallen

Mushing in the Mountains is a five day experience with wild winter camping and your own group of Siberian Huskies.

What should you bring?

Dog sledding can get extremely cold and windy. In order to stay warm and dry, you need plenty of layers. You should have a thin layer of wool long underwear beneath an insulating thicker layer of wool. The third layer should offer wind and cold protection. Another layer of insulation on top of that such as jacket and pants with thick isolation and is also windproof.

Other recommendations:

• Warm boots
• Sleeping bag system
• Headlamp and batteries
• Towel
• Duffel bag to have in the sled with all the luggage you need out on tour
• 1 warm windproof hat that covers your ears well
• 2 pr. lightweight wool or fleece gloves
• 2 pr. light weight liner socks of wool
• 2 pr. of thick warm wool socks sized to fit over the liner socks
• 1 – 2 pr. top and bottom long underwear, wool or some warm synthetic
• 1 – 2 lightweight wool sweaters or fleece
• 1 – 2 pr. Of wool or fleece pants.
• 1 warm pile or fleece jacket or wool sweater
• 1 windproof jacket with a generous hood and sized large enough to fit the clothing under.
• 1 pr. windproof pants sized large enough to fit over your other layers.
• Sunglasses that block out most ultraviolet rays and sunscreen.
• Ski goggles are very good to have on a windy day.
• Comfortable, warm clothes for the evenings
• In-lodge Footwear – something to get you out of your boots, mukluks with insulation, lightweight insulated boots, stout boots or a pair of good jogging shoes.
• Spare hats – a wool stocking cap makes a good spare; a lightweight hat is often useful.
• Contact lenses are a good complement to glasses. In some cases preferable so bring contacts if possible.
Before you leave for you trip, brush up on some of the dog sledding lingo that will save you some time talking, and allow you more time for sledding.

Read about insurance for extreme sports and make sure you are covered during your snowy excursion.


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